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The Culturally Savvy Christian: A Manifesto for Deepening Faith and Enriching Popular Culture in an Age of Christianity-Lite
By Dick Staub
Published by Jossey-Bass
204 pages

It can be a lot of fun to be a Christian in American these days. We can go to enormous churches packed with people just like us. We can be entertained by Christian music, Christian movies, Christian television, Christian cruises, wear Christian clothes, go on Christian diets—there is a whole Christian world to keep us safe from the the world. Too bad it has little to do with authentic Christianity; at least we are entertained. 
 
It can also be a lot of fun NOT to be a Christian, a choice growing in popularity among young people, who are convinced that selecting concepts from a variety of religions and world views to create a custom-blend is best; after all, isn't that why iPods were invented? 

In The Culturally Savvy Christian, author Dick Staub takes the culture to task by calling individual Christians to examine their own assumptions and get serious, savvy and skilled to reclaim the culture by reviving their relationships with their Savior, and present something through our lives that will make the exclusive claims of Christianity irresistible to our cafeteria-style spiritual neighbors. 

No one has been closer to the past half century of cultural maelstrom. Staub's first anecdote recalls as a re-newed believer bypassing marijuana joints at a Jefferson Airplane concert at San Francisco's Fillmore West in the 1967 Summer of Love. In his subsequent roles as a writer, speaker, and radio talk show host, he faithfully tracks popular culture and tries to make sense of it from a Christian perspective. His previous book, Christian wisdom of the Jedi Masters proves just how far he will go to make his point. 

Staub defines "The culturally savvy Christian" as being ". . . serious about faith, savvy about faith and culture, and skilled in relating the two." The book is divided neatly into three sections based on those definitions: "Savvy," "Serious," and "Skilled," which state the case that neither the Christians or the pagans are getting it right. There is a deeper, far more satisfying spirituality available for those who will turn their backs on the cheap substitutes currently offered. He finishes with a vision of true counter culture that may be difficult to achieve, but once experienced, too alluring to dismiss. 
 
It is doubtful that this book will get into the hands of those who need it the most, but there are plenty of examples  in Savvy of lone voices in the wilderness such as Rich Mullins, CS Lewis, Malcolm Muggeridge, and even Nick Park of Wallace and Grommit to inspire those who are ahead of the cultural curve to press on in brewing revolution. 
 
Linda LaFianza


 
 
 

 

 
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