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Salutations: A Tribute to the Prayer Chain
Artist: Various 
Label: Audiolab Records 
Length: 13 tracks, length: 59:11 

The Prayer Chain was one of those legendary bands that had great talent, put out some great music, and then went out in a flash.  The guys who made up that band (Tim Taber, Eric Campuzano, Andy Prickett, and Wayne Everett) have all gone on to bigger things and continue to work together in various capacities to create and nurture some of the most exciting music out there.  So its only fitting that some of the newer bands on the indie scene would want to honor the band by putting together a tribute album. 

All in all this isn't a bad album.  It doesn't suffer from  the uneven sound of many tribute discs.  Predictably, many of  the artists come from Audiolab's own roster, as well as the  Cut and Paste Collective, and in most cases you can hear how The Prayer Chain has influenced their work.  Some of the better songs on the disc are Glisten's slow and dreamy  rendering of "Mercury," Novice's version of "Waterdogs,"  "Chatterbox" from The Northern Lights, and Michael Pritzl's  soul-filled version of "Sky High." 

But in the end, one has to wonder, if a band is so good, why  bother settling for a mere tribute album?  Since most of the  songs come from The Prayer Chain's two best albums, Mercury and Shawl, just dust off your old copies (assuming you've let them get dust-covered) or try to find them on the net.  And supplement that with all the great projects the band members have been involved with like Cush, Lassie Foundation, Charity Empressa, The Violet Burning, Starflyer 59, and the list goes on.  In other words, go for the real thing, baby! 

Ken Mueller  10/7/02 

 

   
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