The Phantom Tollbooth

Music and more from a Christian perspective

Slow down, and have your change ready

Since 1996

Marvin Experience 90Marvin Winans brings us to church. So what did you expect? George Beverly Shea? Try Mary Mary and Donnie McClurkin for starters, as if Marvin himself wasn't enough.....

Jesse Woods, Get Your Burdens Lifted as reviewed in The Phantom Tollbooth

We might well hear more of Wood’s music in the future.

Raymond Scott Woolson, Broken Things Mend as reviewed in Phantom TollboothGenerous as this is with its minutes, Woolson should really leave us wanting more.

Wovenhand Refractory Obdurate reviewed at Phantom Tollboothpick-of-the-month I'm perfectly willing to wager that by the end of the year, I won't have heard a better record. To me, this one is absolute perfection.

Woven Hand The Threshing Floor as reviewed in The Phantom TollboothDavid Eugene Edwards is a gifted artist. How he saw fit to meld folk, gospel, classical and goth into a unique and potent form is beyond me (I even hate having to use those labels to try and describe the music). That is the stuff of genius……

Wye Oak Shriek as Reviewed at Phantom TollboothAs soon as the record begins, you become aware that the band is embracing a different sound, one that mostly jettisons Wasner's guitar work in favor of synth and keyboard loops.

in-the-light-coverCanadian singer Susan Wylde has the type of voice that is direct to the listener.

Tip for success: take your most controversial album and one of your least popular and tour them together live with less than half your original band, and no electronic udders. Does it work?

Forty MartyrsThis unique short recording captures chants from an endangered community and language.

The Yossi Sassi Band officially debuts its unique brand of Middle Eastern metal with a conscience, branching out of the independent musings of the band’s founder into a collaborative effort.

Yossi Sassi - Desert Butterflies album cover as reviewed on The Phantom Tollboothpick-of-the-monthDesert Butterflies has all the elements of music that I love: inventive use of themes, blurring of genre lines, technical performance, attentiveness to melody, and solid performance. The pioneer of "Oriental Rock," Yossi Sassi delivers a memorable sophomore album.

Dan ZimmerDreamFalling somewhere between folk and film noir soundtrack, the hard-to-nail down sound would be at home in a smoky bistro or ripping it up in a small rock club. Gee – they could have even been the band in David Lynch's Twin Peaks...

3907Much can be said about "music without words"

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