Your daughters shall prophesy.

 

 

 

Alisa Turner EP
Artist: Turner, Alisa
Label: Integrity Music
Length: 6 songs/26 minutes

Lauren Daigle. Audrey Assad. Mandisa. Sandra McCracken. Hannah Kerr. Now Alisa Turner. I marvel at how God continues to raise up new voices to declare his praise. I wonder if it’s a partial fulfillment of the prophecy, “your sons and daughters shall prophesy” (Joel 2:28c ESV, italic added).

Declaring the truth is one aspect of prophecy, and that is what these young women are doing in psalm-like ways. Of course, many other women could be added to the list, and even seasoned artists, like Jaci Valesquez, Nichole Nordeman and Amy Grant are finding new voice in declaring the riches that are in Christ. God continues to pour out his Spirit.

On this six song EP Alisa Turner expresses the confidence that comes through experiencing God’s faithfulness in the face of challenges. At age 20 Turner suffered the loss of her father and shortly thereafter debilitation caused by Lyme Disease, which left her bedridden for six years.

So she sings not of self-reliance or self-confidence but faith in God’s ability to sustain her. Ongoing health challenges make life difficult, and some days all she can do is just worship. It gives her the kind of perspective heard on the chorus of “Not Even Now,” one of her boldest declarations:

Not even if the sky is falling
Not even when the enemy roars
Yours is eternal glory
You are forever strong

These songs were birthed at the piano where God continually draws her back to himself. The music reflects this, being a soothing blend of keyboards, guitars and percussion. The other instruments continually add pleasant accents. Delicate guitar chimes grace the chorus of “Lift My Eyes.” A well-placed percussion echo adds punch to “Not Even Now.” Just before the bridge on this same track a delightful guitar interlude adds a rock edge.

Songs like “Not Even Now” and “As it is in Heaven” carry further impact when Turner’s voice merges into a chorus of voices.

“As it is in Heaven” adds violin. I like the phrasing in the chorus that summarizes the longing of the children of God, and even all creation:

On the earth as it is in heaven
Oh, let it be with us here right now
Where your word is fulfilled and your glory revealed
Oh, let it be with us here right now

Surely, this is cry that God delights to answer. Lofty sentiments and elegant music make this a majestic track.

The string-laden, piano ballad “My Prayer for You” conveys blessing on the “bruised reed” and the “smoldering wick.” Christ’s passion ensures that it will not be broken. It will not be put out (see Matthew 12:20). Though the melody conveys a touch of sadness that initially may be off-putting, it becomes memorable with repeated listens. This is empathy in music and verse.

Perhaps the most sublime moment comes on the closing “Psalm 13.” It starts out in lament, but then, as is often the case in the Psalms, it ends in praise. It’s just Turner and the piano. It’s the same way that Lauren Daigle ended her debut, and once again I find it to be one of the most moving moments.

This stands in the line of recent worship-oriented releases that are more articulate than the early efforts in this genre. That’s not to diminish the value and importance of simple choruses or songs conducive to a congregational setting. I just appreciate the growth and maturity. Sons and daughters are proclaiming God’s truth in new settings.

Michael Dalton